ISAIAH 9, YESHUA THE WORD
As an aid to understanding this study, I suggest that you first read No. 93, "Isaiah 7, Yeshua And The
Apostles" and No. 94, "Isaiah 8, Hezekiah and Yeshua."

Isaiah 8 concludes by describing the trials and tribulations of God's people who have ceased to walk with
Him. These things befell God's people of the northern kingdom, Israel, as they were carried away by the
king of Assyria.

"And they shall pass through it (their land), hardly bestead (badly oppressed) and hungry: and it shall
come to pass, that when they shall be hungry, they shall fret themselves, and (the wicked will) curse their
king and their God, and (the righteous will) look upward (to God and pray). And they shall look unto the
earth (around them); and behold trouble and darkness, dimness of anguish; and they shall be driven to
(spiritual) darkness (sent among the heathen)." (Is. 8:21,22).

Like Isaiah 8, Isaiah 9 is a prophecy which applies in both the time of Hezekiah and the time of Yeshua the
Christ. Isaiah 9 begins with a comparative description showing that the Lord will yet partially shelter His
people even as He casts them out.  

"Nevertheless the dimness (of anguish) shall not be such as was in her vexation, when at the first He
lightly afflicted the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, and afterward did more grievously afflict her
by the way of the sea, beyond Jordan, in Galilee of the nations." (Is. 9:1).

The light affliction was the smiting of the northern kingdom, Israel, by Benhadad. "So Benhadad
hearkened unto king Asa, and sent the captains of the hosts which he had against the cities of Israel, and
smote Ijon, and Dan, and Abelbethmaachah, and all Cinneroth, with all the land of Naphtali." (1 Kings 15:
20).

The more grievous affliction was caused by the king of Assyria. " In the days of Pekah king of Israel came
Tiglathpileser king of Assyria, and took Ijon, and Abelbethmaachah, and Janoah, and Kedesh, and Hazor,
and Gilead, and Galilee, all the land of Naphtali, and carried them captive to Assyria." (2 Kings 15:29).

The anguish of the people of the northern kingdom as they were carried away as captives or driven away
from their homeland was less than that during the two previous invasions of their homeland. The next
verse explains why.

"The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of
death, upon them hath the light shined." (Isaiah 9:2).

The northern kingdom was carried off or driven away in the days of king Hezekiah. "Now it came to pass
in the third year of Hoshea son of Elah king of Israel, that Hezekiah the son of Ahaz king of Judah began
to reign. And it came to pass in the fourth year of king Hezekiah, which was the seventh year of Hoshea
son of Elah king of Israel, that Shalmaneser king of Assyria came up against Samaria, and besieged it. And
at the end of three years they took it: even in the sixth year of Hezekiah, that is the ninth year of Hoshea
king of Israel, Samaria was taken. And the king of Assyria did carry away Israel unto Assyria..." (2 Kings 18:
1,9-11).

Before the northern kingdom was overthrown, many took part in a revival initiated by Hezekiah. First
Hezekiah restored worship in the temple in Jerusalem.

"He (Hezekiah) in the first year of his reign, in the first month, opened the doors of the house of the Lord,
and repaired them. And he brought in the priests and the Levites, and gathered them together into the
east street, and said unto them, Hear me, ye Levites, sanctify now yourselves, and sanctify the house of
the Lord God of your fathers...  And the priests went into the inner part of the house of the Lord, to
cleanse it, and brought out all the uncleanness that they found in the temple of the Lord... Now they
began on the first day of the first month to sanctify, and on the eighth day of the month came they to the
porch of the Lord: so they sanctified the house of the Lord in eight days; and in the sixteenth day of the
first month they made an end." (2 Chron. 29:3-5,16,17).

Then Hezekiah called both kingdoms to celebrate the Passover in Jerusalem.

"And Hezekiah sent to all Israel and Judah, and wrote letters also to Ephraim and Manasseh, that they
should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the passover unto the Lord God of Israel. So
the posts passed from city to city through the country of Ephraim and Manasseh even unto Zebulun: but
they laughed them to scorn, and mocked them. Nevertheless divers of Asher and Manasseh and of
Zebulun humbled themselves, and came to Jerusalem...even many of Ephraim, and Manasseh, Issachar,
and Zebulun... And all the congregation of Judah, with the priests and the Levites, and all the
congregation that came out of Israel, and the strangers that came out of the land of Israel, and that dwelt
in Judah, rejoiced. So there was great joy in Jerusalem: for since the time of Solomon the son of David
king of Israel there was not the like in Jerusalem. Then the priests the Levites arose and blessed the
people: and their voice was heard, and their prayer came up to his holy dwelling place, even unto
heaven." (2 Chron. 30:1,10,11,18,25-27).

The Lord heard the blessing of the priests on the people, "the priests the Levites arose and blessed the
people: and their voice was heard, and their prayer came up to His holy dwelling place, even unto
heaven." For the sake of the many who had returned to God and been blessed, God preserved and
sheltered the people of the northern kingdom, even as He removed them from their homeland and
scattered them over the earth.

The scripture we are discussing has a dual application, it also applies to Yeshua the Christ. He began His
ministry in the area described. Here is the scripture again, followed by the explanation from the Book of
Matthew.

"Nevertheless the dimness (of anguish) shall not be such as was in her vexation, when at the first He
lightly afflicted the land of
Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, and afterward did more grievously afflict her
by the way of the sea, beyond Jordan, in
Galilee of the nations. The people that walked in darkness have
seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined."
(Isaiah 9:1,2).

"Now when Jesus had heard that John was cast into prison, He departed into
Galilee; and leaving
Nazareth, he came and dwelt in Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast, in the borders of
Zabulon and
Nephthalim: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, The land of Zabulon,
and the land of Nephthalim, by the way of the sea, beyond Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles; the people
which sat in darkness saw great light; and to them which sat in the region and shadow of death light is
sprung up. From that time Jesus began to preach, and to say, Repent: for the kingdom of heaven is at
hand." (Matt. 4:12-17).

Coming back in time to the exile of the northern tribes, the next verses refer to their judgment and
travail.

"Thou hast multiplied the nation, and not increased the joy: they joy before thee according to the joy in
harvest, and as men rejoice when they divide the spoil." (Is. 9:3).

God had increased the population of the northern kingdom, but they did not joy in their God, "thou hast
multiplied the nation, and not increased the joy." The people rejoiced instead in material wealth, "they joy
before thee according to the joy in harvest, and as men rejoice when they divide the spoil."

The majority of the people of the northern kingdom mocked Hezekiah's call for them to come to worship
the true God in Jerusalem. "So the posts passed from city to city through the country of Ephraim and
Manasseh even unto Zebulun: but they laughed them to scorn, and mocked them." (2 Chron. 30:20). God
expects to be joyful over His people. He won't accept their mockery.

"For Thou hast broken the yoke of his burden, and the staff of his shoulder, the rod of his oppressor, as
in the day of Midian." (Is. 9:4). The people of the northern Kingdom turned away from God despite the fact
that He was their liberator and destroyed their enemies.

"For every battle of the warrior is with confused noise, and garments rolled in blood; but this shall be
with burning and fuel of fire." (Is. 9:5). Finally, God brings armies upon them and casts them out with
raging battles.

"For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and
his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of
Peace." (Is. 9:6).

I stand by the King James Version of the Bible. The word choice of the KJV Bible makes the connection
between prophecies easiest to trace. I believe that its translation was made under inspiration of the Holy
Ghost. I believe that it is the tool God has given us to unlock the end time prophecies, now, when English
is the predominate language of the earth. I believe English is the language that will call the scattered
tribes for the return to the Holy Land. Nevertheless, it occurs to me that this passage was translated by
men who believed it applied only to Christ.

This verse initially was fulfilled by King Hezekiah. He was a gift from God to the tribes of Israel and many
appreciated him and his struggle for godliness and peace. It is highly unlikely, however that they called
him "the mighty God," although after God sent an angel to slaughter 185,000 of his enemies in a single
night, who knows what blasphemous comparisons might have been made. "And it came to pass that
night, that the angel of the Lord went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred fourscore
and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they (the living) were all
(surrounded by) dead corpses." (2 Kings 19:35).

Yeshua the Christ also fulfilled this verse. "Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting
Father, The Prince of Peace" are all titles He is called in the Christian church.

"Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end, upon the throne of David, and upon
his kingdom, to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from henceforth even for ever.
The zeal of the Lord of hosts will perform this." (Is. 9:7).

Hezekiah partially fulfilled this scripture. He sat on the throne of his forefather, David. He restored true
worship, and brought order and justice into his kingdom. God zealously established and protected him.
"And thus did Hezekiah throughout all Judah, and wrought that which was good and right and truth
before the Lord his God. And in every work that he began in the service of the house of God, and in the
law, and in the commandments, to seek his God, he did it with all his heart, and prospered." (2 Chron. 31:
20,21).

Yeshua the Christ fully fulfilled this verse. His government is a spiritual one which continues to grow, "of
the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end." Christ's government now
encompasses one third of the people of the earth. Christ's government is dedicated to peace. "But I say
unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other
also." (Matt. 5:39).

Yeshua sat on the throne of His forefather, David, by right of birth. His genealogy is given in the book of
Matthew. (See Matt. 1:1-17, also see No. 77, "The Root Of David.") To Yeshua the Christ is given the right
to guide the spiritual kingdom forever, "to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from
henceforth even for ever."

"The Lord sent a word into Jacob, and it hath lighted upon Israel. And all the people shall know, even
Ephraim and the inhabitant of Samaria, that say in the pride and stoutness of heart, the bricks are fallen
down, but we will build with hewn stones: the sycomores are cut down, but we will change them into
cedars." (Is. 9:8-10).

God sent Isaiah to King Ahaz as soon as Isaiah agreed to become God's messenger, "the Lord sent a
word into Jacob." Here is Isaiah's agreement. "Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I
send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me." (Is. 6:8).

The Lord told Isaiah to tell Ahaz the following: "And say unto him, Take heed, and be quiet; fear not,
neither be fainthearted for the two tails of these smoking firebrands, for the fierce anger of Rezin with
Syria, and of the son of Remaliah. Because Syria, Ephraim, and the son of Remaliah, have taken evil
counsel against thee, saying, Let us go up against Judah, and vex it, and let us make a breach therein for
us, and set a king in the midst of it, even the son of Tabeal: thus saith the Lord God, It shall not stand,
neither shall it come to pass. For the head of Syria is Damascus, and the head of Damascus is Rezin; and
within threescore and five years shall Ephraim be broken, that it be not a people. And the head of
Ephraim is Samaria, and the head of Samaria is Remaliah’s son. If ye will not believe, surely ye shall not be
established." (Is. 7:4-7).

Despite this prophecy Ahaz remained an idolater and put his trust in the king of Assyria. "At that time did
king Ahaz send unto the kings of Assyria to help him. For again the Edomites had come and smitten
Judah, and carried away captives. The Philistines also had invaded the cities of the low country, and of
the south of Judah, and had taken Bethshemesh, and Ajalon, and Gederoth, and Shocho with the villages
thereof, and Timnah with the villages thereof, Gimzo also and the villages thereof: and they dwelt there.
For the Lord brought Judah low because of Ahaz king of Israel; for he made Judah naked, and
transgressed sore against the Lord. And Tilgathpilneser king of Assyria came unto him, and distressed
him, but strengthened him not.
For Ahaz took away a portion out of the house of the Lord, and out of the
house of the king, and of the princes, and gave it unto the king of Assyria: but he helped him not.
And in
the time of his distress did he trespass yet more against the Lord: this is that king Ahaz.
For he sacrificed
unto the gods of Damascus
, which smote him: and he said, Because the gods of the kings of Syria help
them, therefore will I sacrifice to them, that they may help me. But they were the ruin of him, and of all
Israel." (2 Chron. 28:16-23).

After the death of Ahaz, his son Hezekiah became king. The words of God through the mouth of Isaiah
entered into the heart of Hezekiah and he restored the temple and called both kingdoms to the Passover,
"the Lord sent a word into Jacob (by the mouth of Isaiah), and it hath lighted upon Israel." The
messengers of Hezekiah traveled all over both nations with the call to the feast of Passover, "all the
people shall know, even Ephraim (ruling house of the northern kingdom) and the inhabitant of Samaria
(capital city of the northern kingdom)." "And Hezekiah sent to all Israel and Judah, and wrote letters also
to Ephraim and Manasseh, that they should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the
passover unto the Lord God of Israel."

After the death of Solomon, the northern kingdom, led by Jeroboam a man of Ephraim, broke away from
Solomon's son, Rehoboam. "And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house
of David: if this people go up to do sacrifice in the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, then shall the heart of
this people turn again unto their lord, even unto Rehoboam king of Judah, and they shall kill me, and go
again to Rehoboam king of Judah. Whereupon the king took counsel, and made two calves of gold, and
said unto them, It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem: behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought
thee up out of the land of Egypt. And he set the one in Bethel, and the other put he in Dan. And this thing
became a sin: for the people went to worship before the one, even unto Dan." (1 Kings 12:26-30).

The people of the northern kingdom had replaced the temple in Jerusalem with false worship, they said
"in the pride and stoutness of heart, the bricks are fallen down, but we will build with hewn stones: the
sycomores are cut down, but we will change them into cedars." Idolatry of all Israel is the reason for the
judgment that is described in the remainder of this chapter.

Before considering the remaining verses, Yeshua the Christ also fulfilled Isaiah 9:8-10. As Moses was the
word of God, so Christ was also the Word of God. As God said to Moses, "I will raise them up a Prophet
from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put My
words in his mouth; and he shall speak unto
them all that I shall command him
." (Deut. 18:18). "The Lord sent a word into Jacob, and it hath lighted
upon Israel." The words of Yeshua first were heard by the people of Judah, then after the seven years of
exclusive ministry to Judah, Yeshua's words were heard by the scattered tribes in the Gentile lands
through the mouth of Christ's chosen messenger, Paul.

With time the words of Christ have reached all of the scattered tribes, "and all the people shall know,
even Ephraim and the inhabitant of Samaria." Over the centuries, the scattered tribes have relapsed into
false worship, in our time they accept the false sabbath and feast days of modern Christianity. They say
these things do not matter, "in the pride and stoutness of heart (they say), the bricks are fallen down, but
we will build with hewn stones: the sycomores are cut down, but we will change them into cedars."

The remainder of the chapter is given to judgments on God's people of both Judah and Israel, the
northern kingdom. Each judgment was accompanied by a removal of the people from their land. In the
case of the first judgment God repented and sent them back.

Here is the first judgment. "Therefore the Lord shall set up the adversaries of Rezin (the northern
kingdom, Israel, was historically an adversary of Syria, Rezin's kingdom, see 1 Kings 20:1; 22:1) against
him (Ahaz, king of Judah), and join his enemies together (Rezin, king of Syria confederated with Pekah,
king of the northern kingdom); the Syrians before (the attack on Judah by the northern kingdom), and the
Philistines behind (after the attack on Judah by the northern kingdom); and they shall devour Israel (the
southern kingdom, Judah) with open mouth. For all this his anger is not turned away, but his hand is
stretched out still." (Is. 9:11,12).

This first judgment was on King Ahaz of Judah for his idolatry and his refusal to trust God. "Ahaz was
twenty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned sixteen years in Jerusalem: but he did not that
which was right in the sight of the Lord, like David his father: for he walked in the ways of the kings of
Israel, and made also molten images for Baalim. Wherefore
the Lord his God delivered him into the hand
of the king of Syria (Rezin); and they smote him
, and carried away a great multitude of them captives, and
brought them to Damascus. And
he was also delivered into the hand of the king of Israel, who smote him
with a great slaughter
. The Philistines also had invaded the cities of the low country, and of the south of
Judah
, and had taken Bethshemesh, and Ajalon, and Gederoth, and Shocho with the villages thereof, and
Timnah with the villages thereof, Gimzo also and the villages thereof: and they dwelt there." (2 Chron. 28:
1,2,5,18).

The Syrians smote Judah first, "the Syrians before," then the northern kingdom, Israel, smote them, after
that the Philistines smote them, "the Philistines behind." Between these three invasions Judah was
decimated, "and they shall devour Israel (the southern kingdom, Judah) with open mouth."

As part of this judgment captives were carried away from Judah. "Wherefore the Lord his God delivered
him into the hand of the king of Syria; and they smote him, and carried away a great multitude of them
captives, and brought them to Damascus. And he was also delivered into the hand of the king of Israel,
who smote him with a great slaughter. And the children of Israel carried away captive of their brethren
two hundred thousand, women, sons, and daughters, and took also away much spoil from them, and
brought the spoil to Samaria." (2 Chron. 28:5,8).

However, God changed His mind and sent the captives taken by Israel home to Judah."But a prophet of
the Lord was there, whose name was Oded: and he went out before the host that came to Samaria, and
said unto them, Behold, because the Lord God of your fathers was wroth with Judah, He hath delivered
them into your hand, and ye have slain them in a rage that reacheth up unto heaven. And now ye purpose
to keep under the children of Judah and Jerusalem for bondmen and bondwomen unto you: but are there
not with you, even with you, sins against the Lord your God? Now hear me therefore, and deliver the
captives again, which ye have taken captive of your brethren: for the fierce wrath of the Lord is upon
you. Then certain of the heads of the children of Ephraim... stood up against them that came from the war,
and said unto them, Ye shall not bring in the captives hither... And the men... took the captives, and with
the spoil clothed all that were naked among them, and arrayed them, and shod them, and gave them to
eat and to drink, and anointed them, and carried all the feeble of them upon asses, and brought them to
Jericho, the city of palm trees, to their brethren: then they returned to Samaria." (2 Chron. 28:9-13,15).   

The second judgment was against the northern kingdom, Israel. "For the people turneth not unto him that
smiteth them, neither do they seek the Lord of hosts. Therefore the Lord will cut off from Israel head and
tail, branch and rush, in one day. The ancient and honourable, he is the head; and the prophet that
teacheth lies, he is the tail. For the leaders of this people cause them to err; and they that are led of them
are destroyed. Therefore the Lord shall have no joy in their young men, neither shall have mercy on their
fatherless and widows: for every one is an hypocrite and an evildoer, and every mouth speaketh folly.
For all this his anger is not turned away, but his hand is stretched out still." (Is. 9:13-17).

"In the twelfth year of Ahaz king of Judah began Hoshea the son of Elah to reign in Samaria over Israel
nine years. And he did that which was evil in the sight of the Lord, but not as the kings of Israel that were
before him. Against him came up Shalmaneser king of Assyria; and Hoshea became his servant, and gave
him presents. And the king of Assyria found conspiracy in Hoshea: for he had sent messengers to So king
of Egypt, and brought no present to the king of Assyria, as he had done year by year: therefore the king
of Assyria shut him up, and bound him in prison. Then the king of Assyria came up throughout all the land,
and went up to Samaria, and besieged it three years. In the ninth year of Hoshea the king of Assyria took
Samaria, and carried Israel away into Assyria, and placed them in Halah and in Habor by the river of
Gozan, and in the cities of the Medes." (2 Kings 17:1-6).  

With the fall of the capital city Samaria, the Lord "cut off from Israel head and tail, branch and rush, in one
day." The northern kingdom was judged for not returning to God when summoned by Hezekiah.

The third judgment was on Judah for refusing Yeshua the Christ, they also were cast out of the Holy
Land. "For wickedness burneth as the fire: it shall devour the briers and thorns, and shall kindle in the
thickets of the forest, and they shall mount up like the lifting up of smoke. Through the wrath of the Lord
of hosts is the land darkened, and the people shall be as the fuel of the fire: no man shall spare his
brother. And he shall snatch on the right hand, and be hungry; and he shall eat on the left hand, and they
shall not be satisfied: they shall eat every man the flesh of his own arm: Manasseh, Ephraim; and Ephraim,
Manasseh: and they together shall be against Judah. For all this his anger is not turned away, but his
hand is stretched out still." (Is. 9:18-21).

At the time of this judgment, the northern kingdom, variously called Ephraim, Samaria and Israel, had
been scattered among the Gentile nations. Ephraim and Manasseh had lost their tribal identity, but this
scripture says they together came against Judah. A logical conclusion is that their descendants were part
of the Roman armies that sacked and destroyed Jerusalem in 70 AD.

The scripture begins with the judgment of Yeshua the Christ. "Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then
with Jesus which is called Christ? They all say unto him, Let Him be crucified. And the governor said, Why,
what evil hath He done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified. When Pilate saw that
he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before
the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it.
Then answered all the
people, and said, His blood be on us, and on our children
." (Matt. 27:22-25).

In their judgment of Yeshua, the people of Jerusalem sealed their own doom, "for wickedness burneth as
the fire: it shall devour the briers and thorns (the wicked men who condemned Yeshua, see Micah 7:4),
and shall kindle in the thickets of the forest (all the people of Judah, trees are a symbol of men, see Is. 61:
3), and they shall mount up like the lifting up of smoke (they shall all be gone).

During the crucifixion of Yeshua, the land turned dark, "through the wrath of the Lord of hosts is the land
darkened." "And it was the third hour, and they crucified him. And when the sixth hour was come, there
was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour." (Mark 15:25,33).

All of the people were condemned," the people shall be as the fuel of the fire." The rest of this scripture
is understood by considering the siege of Jerusalem.

The siege of Jerusalem, the capital city, began with a stalemate. The Roman armies established a
permanent camp just outside the city and dug a trench around its walls. Those attempting to escape the
city were crucified. A stockpile of food was burned by Jewish leaders to induce the defenders to fight
instead of negotiating peace. Many city dwellers and soldiers died of starvation during the siege. By the
summer of 70 AD, the Romans breached the walls of Jerusalem, ransacked and burned the city.

In  their affliction, the Jewish leaders turned against their brethren and burned food, "no man shall spare
his brother." The city dwellers competed for food, but they all starved,"he shall snatch on the right hand,
and be hungry; and he shall eat on the left hand, and they shall not be satisfied: they shall eat every man
the flesh of his own arm."

After the scattering of the lost tribes, all of the tribes intermarried, "Manasseh, Ephraim; and Ephraim,
Manasseh." God brought these intermarried descendants of the scattered tribes against Judah, and they
killed their brethren and burned Jerusalem, "they together shall be against Judah."

Each of these three judgments have concluded with the words,"for all this his anger is not turned away,
but his hand is stretched out still." This continuing judgment was fulfilled in WWII and the Holocaust. (See
No. 39, "The Judgments Of Ezekiel 7.")

Amo Paul Bishop Roden